City relaxes food truck location rules in time for summer street snackin’

Citing public interest in food trucks and “more creative uses of underutilized parking spaces,” the city announced new rules governing food truck, sidewalk vendors and “parklets,” curb-level decks that extend the sidewalk into the street. The parklets can be used as sidewalk cafes where the existing sidewalk in front of a restaurant is narrower than the required eight feet.

Previously, food trucks had to park on private property. Now they will be able to reserve metered street parking spaces. It’s not a free-for-all, though. The new rules limit food truck parking space permits to ten per district, and each permit must be approved by the abutting business or property owner, as well any restaurants within 50 feet.

Sidewalk vendors aren’t limited in number, but will require similar  approval from neighboring businesses.

Read the full guide with new rules here.

 

Elizabeth Park summer concert lineup announced

Here are the bands scheduled to play at Elizabeth Park this summer. Concerts are on Thursday evenings from 6pm to 8pm. Bring a sweater – the park’s canopy of old-growth trees keep it cool even on warm summer evenings.

June 20: Ranger and the Re-Arrangers, “Gypsy jazz and swing.”

June 27: The Kaeli Earle Trio, “Jazzfunk originals, covers and jams.”

July 4: Brian Butler and Bridge, “Rockin’ rock and steamy blues.”

July 11: Sir Reginold Cosgrove and His Nighttime Singers, “Eclectic, throwback, folk rock.”

July 18: The Di Young Combo, “Sultry jazz and pop ensemble.”

July 25: Fossil Rock, “’50s and ’60s hits.”

August 1: Dr. Jimmy and the Swing Time Serenaders, “Big band.”

August 8: Whitewing with The Soul Shaker Horns, “Sassy soul, funk, blues and R&B.”

August 15: Those Guys, “Oldskool and newskool dance covers.”

August 22: Heroes Rock Band, “Youth rock band.”

WWU construction to add 264 dorm beds

Western Washington University has some big construction projects in the works, including a new science building, academic support offices, and the replacement of an old dormitory with a larger one.

The Highland Hall dorms are slated for demolition this fall. They were built in 1956, and house 136 students. The new building will house 400, and will include amenities to make them more appealing to students beyond their first year of school, according to WWU Director of University Communications Paul Cocke. It’s expected to be completed in time for the 2021 fall semester.

WWU’s student housing includes 16 dormitories and an apartment complex, accommodating more than 4,000 students. In the fall of 2018, WWU had 16,121 enrolled students, including a record number of incoming freshmen, who are more likely to live on campus. Eight-eight percent of WWU freshmen spend their first year in the dorms.

Expect construction delays at Boulevard Park

Crews will be busy in Boulevard Park all summer, removing the wooden pedestrian overpass at the north end of the park and rerouting utility lines that the overpass currently supports. Both the main park entrance off Bayview Drive and the entrance at the end of the South Bay Trail will be closed intermittently while utilities are rerouted underground. Pedestrian access via the Taylor Street Dock will remain open.

“New underground utilities will be installed in Bayview Drive up to State Street, resulting in predictable services to the park for decades to come,” said Leslie Bryson, Bellingham’s Park and Recreation Director. “The City asks for everyone’s patience while contractors move around the site with large equipment.” Completion expected in September.

Boulevard Pedestrian Overpass was built in the 1970s to provide pedestrian access to the park from State Street prior to the opening of the South Bay Trail in 2004. The overpass is in poor condition, and has been closed for safety reasons since 2016.

Bars open on Christmas

Here ya go – bars that will be open Christmas Day/Night, listed in order of opening time. The Wild Buffalo and Cap’s will both have karaoke tonight, with Aireekah Laudert and Zach Zinn as the respective hosts.

Waterfront – 8am

State Street – 4pm (note: the Beaver will be closed)

Rumors – 4pm

Cap’s – 5pm

Galloway’s – 5pm

Grand Ave – 5pm

Jack’s – 6pm

Uisce – 6pm

McKay’s – 6pm

The Orion – 7pm

Wild Buffalo – 9pm

Quick bite: Honey Moon Alley Bar and Cidery

by June Hathaway

The stretch of North State Street dubbed the Alley District has seen a lot of change in the past decade. The neighborhood that was once home to a revolving cast of scrappy shops and arts ventures anchored by the Hub Community Bike Shop is now dominated by condos and apartment blocks. And Honey Moon, which spent that decade serving up mead in the Alley District, is making changes, too. Yummy, boozy changes.

Honey Moon opened in 2009 as a meadery – think a brewpub for mead, a honey-based brew that is one of the oldest alcoholic drinks. The term “honeymoon” is derived from the ancient tradition of celebrating the first month, or moon, of a new marriage by getting blotto with your bae on mead brought by the wedding guests. Honey Moon brews its meads – and ciders – on site. (We reviewed a flight of Honey Moon’s meads back in 2014.)

The recent addition of spirits – reflected in the new “Alley Bar” tagline – opened the door for a roster of cocktails that craftily combine mead with liquor and more traditional mixers, including house-made flavored sodas like root beer and turmeric ginger ale. I couldn’t tell you what turmeric tastes like, but I can certainly tell you that Honey Moon’s ginger ale makes a damn fine whiskey ginger.

The food menu has expanded, too. Happy hour food specials center on $5 whiskey-cider-cheese fondue served with house-made bread, and free bar snacks: snickerdoodle fortune cookies, sweet and salty popcorn and curry pork rinds. (If that last bit sounds familiar, it’s because the wizard behind this kitchen curtain is Michelle Schutte, who instituted a similar happy hour giveaway during her tenure at Redlight.) Happy hour is Monday-Saturday 5-7pm, and you also get a buck off all drinks.

If you’re craving sturdier fare, there are small plates priced from $5 to $8, including a daily soup and salad, pulled pork with locally made Hosa hot sauce, Spanish-style meatballs, baked chevre, and more.

Despite the changes, some traditions endure. Honey Moon continues to host Bellingham’s longest-running open mic on Wednesday nights, and on December 22, readers will take the stage in the fourth annual tag-team reading of Beowulf, the epic poem about a warrior who loves his mead and a monster who loves his mother. As for new events, keep an eye out for True Crime Trivia on the first Monday of each month.

Honey Moon Alley Bar and Cidery
1053 N. State St. (alley entrance)
Open Monday through Saturday 5pm to midnight, happy hour 5pm to 7pm.

Weekender: Bellingham events for September 21-23

Commercial Street Night Market

This is the last Night Market of the season, and it’s gonna be a doozy. Bike polo, sea shantys, a climbing wall, and karaoke, alongside local vendors and the Uisce beer garden. Friday from 6pm-10pm on Commercial Street between Magnolia and Holly.

SeaFeast

The name kinda says it all unless you, like me, see “SeaBeast,” in which case we will both *probably* be disappointed. SeaFeast encompasses a huge array of activities, so be sure to check their website for complete info. In a nutshell, there’s poetry, art, and film downtown on and seafood galore at the harbor on Friday.  Saturday brings demonstrations, activities, music and, of course, more food.  Friday noon-11, Saturday 10am-8pm, various locations.

Your Vote Counts Block Party

Indivisible is throwing a party, and you’re invited! Grab a brew at the beer garden and chat with the candidates and reps from organizations tabling the event. There’ll be music and dance, and you can even register to vote. Sunday 1pm-3pm at Depot Square Market.

Lyrics Born with Bukue One and All Star Opera

I like it, I love it! Bay area rapper and “serial collaborator” Lyrics Born always puts on a great show, full of melodic funk. He’s touring in support of a new album, Quite a Life, and supported by Seattle hiphop collective All Star Opera and fellow California veteran Bukue One. Sure to be a sweaty good time. Sunday 9pm at the Wild Buffalo.

For a full list of the weekend’s events, see the Bellingham on Tap calendar.

 

Weekender for September 14-16

Sippin’ on Cider: A Bellingham Cider Tasting Festival

Lost Giants Cider is hosting Sippin’ on Cider, a festival to benefit Shifting Gears. There’ll be nine cideries participating, plus food trucks, music, outdoor living rooms, games, and a photo booth. $25 at the door gets you all that, an 8 ounce tasting glass, and three fill-ups. Friday, 6pm-10pm, 1200 Meador Ave.

Maneken Hand, Dreadful Children, Gallowmaker ItchyKitty, Adventur

Waterfront music booker and N7E Records founder Robby Cleary died unexpectedly this week. This would have been a great show in any event, but now it’s also a chance to honor the memory of a true and tireless punk believer. Waterfront Tavern, 521 Holly St., Saturday at 9pm, $7.

Cascadia Skillshare and Barter Gathering

Go up the country and learn “practical new-fangled and old-timey skills. Bee keeping, yarn spinning, native plant foods, fermentation, gardening wisdoms, livestock care, food preservation and much more.” There’ll be hourly classes and a field to barter your stuff in, plus music, food and beer.  Admission is $20 a day or $35 for both days, and you can camp Saturday night for an extra $10. Saturday/Sunday, 10am-5pm, on north Lake Whatcom at 2582 North Shore Rd.

Catch them while you can: the markets of summer’s end

by June Hathaway

Never mind the thermometer – the truth is, summer is slip-slidin’ away. Fortunately for those of us who spent the past couple of months hiding in darkened rooms, there’s still time to experience Bellingham’s seasonal outdoor markets (the OG Downtown Farmers Market at Chestnut and Railroad runs year-round). Find our local markets below, listed in order of time left to get your butt over there before they wrap up for the season.

In town

Fairhaven Farmers Market
Wednesdays through August, 3pm-7pm at 10th and Mill (map).
The Downtown Farmers Market’s chill little sister features fresh local produce arrayed under the shady pergolas that ring the Fairhaven Village Green’s sunny lawn. There’s live music from 4-6, making it a lively spot for a midweek picnic.

The Barkley Market
Wednesdays through August, 11am-6pm at Barkley Village (map)
The northeast side shopping-center-slash-office-park livens up the workweek with a Wednesday market offering food trucks and lawn games from 11am-2pm, mini farmer’s market 4pm-6pm.

Birchwood International Market
Last Fridays through September, 6pm-10pm at Park Manor Shopping Center aka Old Albertson’s (map)
No doubt folks in Birchwood, part of the city’s largest food desert, would rather have a grocery store. But since Albertson’s hasn’t released its death grip on their old store location even now that they’ve sold it, residents will make the most of this neighborhood market with craft vendors, food trucks, and music in the meantime.

Farther afield

While Bellingham proper is home to a few urban farms, most of the produce you’ll see at markets comes from farms in the rural areas surrounding the city. These community markets get you even closer to the source.

Lynden Farmers Market
Saturdays through September, 10am-2pm at Centennial Park (map)
Produce, handmade toys, and more, just a short walk from the Jansen Arts Center and the delightfully old-timey Pioneer Museum, which will have free admission on September 22.

Edison Farmers Market
Sundays through September, 10am-2pm at the Edison Granary (map)
Check out the goods at the farmers market, and then explore tiny Edison, the manic pixie dream girl of towns-that-don’t-officially-exist.

Ferndale Farmers Market
Fridays, 3pm-7pm through October 5 at Centennial Riverwalk Park (map)

In addition to a weekly bounty of local eats and goods, you’ll find a monthly flea market here on September 14 and October 5.